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Free GMAT Sample Questions: GMAT Practice Test


The following is a complete practice test for GMAT verbal section.

Questions: 41

Time: 75 Minutes

   The social sciences are less likely
  than other intellectual enterprises to
  get credit for their accomplishments.
  Arguably, this is so because the
(5) theories and conceptual constructs of
  the social sciences are especially
  accessible: human intelligence
  apprehends truths about human affairs
  with particular facility. And the
(10) discoveries of the social sciences,
  once isolated and labeled, are
  quickly absorbed into conventional
  wisdom, whereupon they lose their
  distinctiveness as scientific advances.
(15)  This underappreciation of the social
  sciences contrasts oddly with what many
  see as their overutilization. Game
  theory is pressed into service in studies
  of shifting international alliances.
(20) Evaluation research is called
  upon to demonstrate successes or
  failures of social programs.Models from
  economics and demography become
  the definitive tools for examining the
(25) financial base of social security. Yet
  this rush into practical applications
  is itself quite understandable: public
  policy must continually be made, and
  policymakers rightly feel that even
(30) tentative findings and untested theories
  are better guides to decision-making
  than no findings and no theories at all.

1. The author is primarily concerned with
(A) advocating a more modest view, and less widespread utilization, of the social sciences
(B) analyzing the mechanisms for translating discoveries into applications in the social sciences
(C) dissolving the air of paradox inherent in human beings studying themselves
(D) explaining a peculiar dilemma that the social sciences are in
(E) maintaining a strict separation between pure and applied social science

2. Which of the following is a social science discipline that the author mentions as being possibly overutilized?
(A) Conventional theories of social change
(B) Game theory
(C) Decision-making theory
(D) Economic theories of international alliances
(E) Systems analysis

3. It can be inferred from the passage that, when speaking of the "overutilization" (line 17) of the social sciences, the
author is referring to the
(A) premature practical application of social science advances
(B) habitual reliance on the social sciences even where common sense would serve equally well
(C) practice of bringing a greater variety of social science disciplines to bear on a problem than the nature
of the problem warrants
(D) use of social science constructs by people who do not fully understand them
(E) tendency on the part of social scientists to recast everyday truths in social science jargon

4. The author confronts the claim that the social sciences are being overutilized with
(A) proof that overextensions of social science results are self-correcting
(B) evidence that some public policy is made without any recourse to social science findings or theories
(C) a long list of social science applications that are perfectly appropriate and extremely fruitful
(D) the argument that overutilization is by and large the exception rather than the rule
(E) the observation that this practice represents the lesser of two evils under existing circumstances

5. Wearing either a lap seat belt or a shoulder-and-lap seat belt protects passengers from the major types of injuries incurred in head-on automobile collisions. In such collisions, however, passengers wearing lap seat belts alone frequently suffer internal injuries caused by the seat belt itself. Such injuries do not occur when shoulder-and-lap seat belts are worn.
 
Which of the following conclusions about passengers involved in head-on automobile collisions is best supported by the statements above?

(A) No type of seat belt provides passengers with adequate protection from injury.
(B) The injuries that passengers most frequently incur are internal injuries.
(C) Head-on automobile collisions cause more injuries to passengers than any other kind of automobile accident does.
(D) It is safer for passengers to wear a shoulder-and-lap seat belt than to wear a lap seat belt alone.
(E) It is safer for passengers to wear no seat belt than to wear a lap seat belt alone.

6. Nonprescription sunglasses shield the wearer's eyes from damaging ultraviolet sunlight. Squinting, however, provides protection from ultraviolet rays that is at least as good as the protection from nonprescription sunglasses. There is, therefore, no health advantage to be gained by wearing nonprescription sunglasses rather than squinting.
 
Which of the following, if true, most seriously weakens support for the conclusion above?

(A) Many opticians offer prescription sunglasses that not only screen out ultraviolet sunlight but also provide corrective vision.
(B) Some nonprescription sunglasses provide less protection from ultraviolet sunlight than does squinting.
(C) Squinting strains facial muscles and causes headaches and fatigue.
(D) Many people buy sunglasses because they feel that sunglasses are fashionable.
(E) Some people squint even when they are wearing sunglasses.

7.Once positioned in space, the Hubble Space Telescope will capture light from sources twenty times fainter compared to those that can be detected by ground-based instruments.
(A) compared to those that can be detected
(B) compared to those they can detect
(C) than that can be detected
(D) than those that can be detected
(E) than those detecting

8.One reason why more young people lose their virginity during the summer than at other times of the year undoubtedly is because school vacations give adolescents more free time.
(A) One reason why more young people lose their virginity during the summer than at other times of the year undoubtedly is because
(B) If young people lose their virginity more during the summer than other seasons, it is undoubtedly because
(C) One undoubtable reason that young people lose their virginity more during the summer than other times is
(D) One reason more young people lose their virginity during the summer than at other times of the year is undoubtedly that
(E) Young people lose their virginity more often during the summer undoubtedly because, for one reason,

9.No less an authority than Walter Cronkite has reported that half of all Americans never read a book.
(A) No less an authority than
(B) Nonetheless an authority
(C) Nevertheless authoritarian
(D) Not less an authority than
(E) An authority not less than

10.Nowhere in Prakta is the influence of modern European architecture more apparent than their government buildings.
(A) more apparent than their
(B) so apparent as their
(C) more apparent than in its
(D) so apparent than in their
(E) as apparent as it is in its

   The term "Ice Age" may give a wrong
  impression. The epoch that geologists
  know as the Pleistocene and that
  spanned the 1.5 to 2.0 million years
(5) prior to the current geologic epoch was
  not one long continuous glaciation, but
  a period of oscillating climate with
  ice advances punctuated by times of
  interglacial climate not very different
(10) from the climate experienced now. Ice
  sheets that derived from an ice cap cen-
  tered on northern Scandinavia reached
  southward to Central Europe. And Beyond
  the margins of the ice sheets, climatic
(15) oscillations affected most of the rest
  of the world; for example, in the
  deserts, periods of wetter conditions
  (pluvials) contrasted with drier,
  interpluvial periods. Although the time
(20) involved is so short, about 0.04 percent
  of the total age of the Earth, the
  amount of attention devoted to the
  Pleistocene has been incredibly large,
  probably because of its immediacy, and
(25) because the epoch largely coincides
  with the appearance on Earth of humans
  and their immediate ancestors.
   There is no reliable way of dating
  much of the Ice Age. Geological dates
(30) are usually obtained by using the rates
  of decay of various radioactive elements
  found in minerals. Some of these rates
  are suitable for very old rocks but
  involve increasing errors when used for
(35) young rocks; others are suitable for
  every young rocks and errors increase
  rapidly in older rocks. Most of the Ice
  Age spans a period of time for which no
  element has as appropriate decay rate.
(40)  Nevertheless, researchers of the
  pleistocene epoch have developed all
  sorts of more or less fanciful model sche-
  mes of how they would have arranged
  the Ice Age had they been in charge
(45) of events. For example, an each
  classification of Alpine glaciation
  suggested the existence there of four
  glaciations, named the Gunz, Mindel,
  Riss, and Wurm. This succession was
(50) based primarily on a series of deposits
  and events not directly related to
  glacial and interglacial periods, rather
  than on the more usual modern method
  of studying biological remains found
(55) in interglacial beds themselves
  interstratified within glacial deposits.
  Yet this succession was forced willy-
  nilly onto the glaciated parts of
  Northern Europe, where there are
(60) partial successions of true glacial
  ground moraines and interglacial
  deposits, with hopes of ultimately
  piecing them together to provide a
  complete Pleistocene succession.
(65) Eradication of the Alpine nomenclature
  is still proving a Herculean task.
   There is no conclusive evidence about
  the relative length, complexity, and
  temperatures of the various glacial and
(70) interglacial periods. We do not know
  whether we live in a postglacial period
  or an interglacial period. The chill
  truth seems to be that we are already
  past the optimum climate of postglacial
(75) time. Studies of certain fossil
  distributions and of the pollen of
  certain temperate plants suggest
  decreases of a degree or two in both
  summer and winter temperatures and,
(80) therefore, that we may be in the
  declining climatic phase leading to
  glaciation and extinction.

11. In the passage, the author is primarily concerned with
(A) searching for an accurate method of dating the Pleistocene epoch
(B) discussing problems involved in providing an accurate picture of the Pleistocene epoch
(C) declaring opposition to the use of the term "Ice Age" for the Pleistocene epoch
(D) criticizing fanciful schemes about what happened in the Pleistocene epoch
(E) refuting the idea that there is no way to tell if we are now living in an Ice Age

12. The "wrong impression" (lines 1-2) to which the author refers is the idea that the
(A) climate of the Pleistocene epoch was not very different from the climate we are now experiencing
(B) climate of the Pleistocene epoch was composed of periods of violent storms
(C) Pleistocene epoch consisted of very wet, cold periods mixed with very dry, hot periods
(D) Pleistocene epoch comprised one period of continuous glaciation during which Northern Europe was covered with ice sheets
(E) Pleistocene epoch has no long periods during which much of the Earth was covered by ice

13. According to the passage, one of the reasons for the deficiencies of the "early classification of Alpine glaciation" (lines 45-46) is that it was
(A) derived from evidence that was only tangentially related to times of actual glaciation
(B) based primarily on fossil remains rather than on actual living organisms
(C) an abstract, imaginative scheme of how the period might have been structured
(D) based on unmethodical examinations of randomly chosen glacial biological remains
(E) derived from evidence that had been haphazardly gathered from glacial deposits and inaccurately evaluated

14. Which of the following does the passage imply about the "early classification of Alpine glaciation" (lines 45-46)?
(A) It should not have been applied as widely as it was.
(B) It represents the best possible scientific practice, given the tools available at the time.
(C) It was a valuable tool, in its time, for measuring the length of the four periods of glaciation.
(D) It could be useful, but only as a general guide to the events of the Pleistocene epoch.
(E) It does not shed any light on the methods used at the time for investigating periods of glaciation.

15. It can be inferred from the passage that an important result of producing an accurate chronology of events of the Pleistocene epoch would be a
(A) clearer idea of the origin of the Earth
(B) clearer picture of the Earth during the time that humans developed
(C) clearer understanding of the reasons for the existence of deserts
(D) more detailed understanding of how radioactive dating of minerals works
(E) firmer understanding of how the northern polar ice cap developed

16. The author refers to deserts primarily in order to
(A) illustrate the idea that an interglacial climate is marked by oscillations of wet and dry periods
(B) illustrate the idea that what happened in the deserts during the Ice Age had far-reaching effects even on the ice sheets of Central and Northern Europe
(C) illustrate the idea that the effects of the Ice Age's climatic variations extended beyond the areas of ice
(D) support the view that during the Ice Age sheets of ice covered some of the deserts of the world
(E) support the view that we are probably living in a postglacial period

17. The author would regard the idea that we are living in an interglacial period as
(A) unimportant
(B) unscientific
(C) self-evident
(D) plausible
(E) absurd

18.In the 1980’s the rate of increase of the minority population of the United States was nearly twice as fast as the 1970’s.
(A) twice as fast as
(B) twice as fast as it was in
(C) twice what it was in
(D) two times faster than that of
(E) two times greater than

19.In Holland, a larger percentage of the gross national product is spent on defense of their coasts from rising seas than is spent on military defense in the United States.
(A) In Holland, a larger percentage of the gross national product is spent on defense of their coasts from rising seas than is spent on military defense in the United States.
(B) In Holland they spend a larger percentage of their gross national product on defending their coasts from rising seas than the United States does on military defense.
(C) A larger percentage of Holland’s gross national product is spent on defending their coasts from rising seas than the United States spends on military defense.
(D) Holland spends a larger percentage of its gross national product defending its coasts from rising seas than the military defense spending of the United States.
(E) Holland spends a larger percentage of its gross national product on defending its coasts from rising seas than the United States does on military defense.

20. Studies of workplace safety in construction and manufacturing firms have found that the rate of injuries tends to rise when the firms' work loads increase. Since inexperienced workers are often hired by these firms when work loads increase, the higher rate of injuries is undoubtedly due to a higher accident rate for inexperienced workers.
 
Which of the following statements, if true, would most weaken the conclusion drawn above?

(A) Many of the inexperienced workers hired when the firms' work loads increase are hired only for temporary positions.
(B) The studies of workplace safety were focused only on injuries that resulted in lost workdays.
(C) There is a much higher rate of injury in construction firms than in manufacturing firms.
(D) The accident rate for experienced workers tends to increase whenever the firms' work loads increase.
(E) Firms that hire inexperienced workers for potentially dangerous jobs are required to provide them with training.

21. The facts show that the fear of flying in airplanes is not rational. In 1986 alone, there were 46,000 fatalities in highway accidents, but from 1980 to the present an average of only 77 per year in accidents on major domestic airlines. The rate for regional airlines was only slightly higher.

If the evidence cited above is accurate, which of the following would be most important to know in order to evaluate the force of that evidence?
(A) Whether repeated airplane travel allays fear of flying in airplanes
(B) Whether regional and domestic airlines spend the same average amount of time per aircraft on maintenance
(C) How many people reported a fear of flying in airplanes that was strong enough to prevent them from traveling by air
(D) How many people per year have traveled by highway and how many by air since 1980
(E) How much higher the accident rate has been for regional airlines than for major domestic airlines since 1980
 

   Echolocating bats emit sounds
  in patterns—characteristic of
  each species—that contain both
  frequency-modulated (FM) and
(5) constant-frequency (CF) signals.
  The broadband FM signals and the
  narrowband CF signals travel out to
  a target, reflect from its, and return
  to the hunting bat. In this process
(10) of transmission and reflection, the
  sounds are changed, and the changes
  in the echoes enable the bat to perceive
  features of the target.
   The FM signals report information
(15) about target characteristics that modify
  the timing and the fine frequency
  structure, or spectrum, of echoes—for
  example, the target's size, shape,
  texture, surface structure, and
(20) direction in space. Because of their
  narrow bandwidth, CF signals portray
  only the target's presence and, in the
  case of some bat species, its motion
  relative to the bat's. Responding to
(25) changes in the CF echo's frequency,
  bats of some species correct in flight
  for the direction and velocity of their
  moving prey.

22. According to the passage, the information provided to the bat by CF echoes differs from that provided by FM echoes in which of the following ways?
(A) Only CF echoes alert the bat to moving targets.
(B) Only CF echoes identify the range of widely spaced targets.
(C) Only CF echoes report the target's presence to the bat.
(D) In some species, CF echoes enable the bat to judge whether it is closing in on its target.
(E) In some species, CF echoes enable the bat to discriminate the size of its target and the direction in which the target is moving.

24. According to the passage, the configuration of the target is reported to the eholocating bat by changes in the
(A) echo spectrum of CF signals
(B) echo spectrum of FM signals
(C) direction and velocity of the FM echoes
(D) delay between transmission and reflection of the CF signals
(E) relative frequencies of the FM and the CF echoes

25. The author presents the information concerning bat sonar in a manner that could be best described as
(A) argumentative
(B) commendatory
(C) critical
(D) disbelieving
(E) objective

26. Which of the following best describes the organization of the passage?
(A) A fact is stated, a process is outlined, and specific details of the process are described.
(B) A fact is stated, and examples suggesting that a distinction needs correction are considered.
(C) A fact is stated, a theory is presented to explain that fact, and additional facts are introduced to validate the theory.
(D) A fact is stated, and two theories are compared in light of their explanations of this fact.
(E) A fact is stated, a process is described, and examples of still another process are illustrated in detail.

27. Which of the following, if true, would argue most strongly against the conclusion above?
(A) Since the inventory of spare parts kept at each airport is smaller than in earlier years, planes are often delayed at an airport while parts are flown in from another airport, and then repairs are carefully made and checked.
(B) Air fatalities from 1980 to the present have been concentrated in the last two years, with the rate rising sharply.
(C) The number of reports of near collisions in midair in 1986 was less than half those in a typical year of the 1960's, even with double the traffic of the 1960's.
(D) Many reported near collisions in midair are closer than regulations allow but are nevertheless without actual danger.
(E) Between 1980 and 1986, safety improvements in the design of automobiles steadily improved their crashworthiness.

28.In 1985 a consumer agency concluded that Xylo brand bicycles are safer to ride than are Zenon brand bicycles. The agency based the conclusion on the ratio of the number of rider injuries to the number of riding hours for each brand of bicycle from 1981 through 1984. Yet for identically designed bicycles manufactured since 1985, the number of rider injuries has been twice as great among riders of Xylos as among riders of Zenons. Therefore, the agency's conclusion would have been different for the period since 1985.
 
Which of the following is an assumption that, if true, supports the claim that the agency's conclusion would have been different for the period since 1985?

(A) For the period since 1985, the number of riding hours for Zenons totaled at least half the number of riding hours for Xylos.
(B) Of all the bicycles ridden in the period since 1985, the percentage of Xylos ridden was twice the percentage of Zenons ridden.
(C) Prior to 1985, Zenon owners were more likely than Xylo owners to report the injuries they sustained while riding their bicycles.
(D) In 1985 the agency had miscalculated the ratio for Xylos, for Zenons, or for both.
(E) Soon after the agency had issued its report, consumer demand for Xylos increased more rapidly than did consumer demand for Zenons.

29. In October 1987 the United States stock market suffered a major drop in prices. During the weeks after the drop, the volume of stocks traded also dropped sharply to well below what had been the weekly average for the preceding year. However, the volume for the entire year was not appreciably different from the preceding year's volume.
 
Which of the following, if true, resolves the apparent contradiction presented in the passage above?

(A) Foreign investors usually buy United States stocks only when prices are low.
(B) The number of stock buyers in 1987 remained about the same as it had been the preceding year.
(C) For some portion of 1987, the volume of stocks traded was higher than the average for that year.
(D) The greater the volume of stocks traded in a given year, the lower the average price per share on the United States stock market for that year.
(E) The volume of stocks traded rises and falls in predictable cycles.

30. In a recent year California produced an orange crop equal to only seventy-six percent of Florida's orange crop. However, when citrus crops as a group, including oranges, were compared, the California crop was twenty-three percent greater than Florida's crop for the same year.
 
If the information above is true, which of the following can properly be concluded about the Florida and California citrus crops in the year mentioned?

(A) Florida's climate was suited only to growing oranges.
(B) Florida produced larger oranges than California did.
(C) California produced more oranges than it did non-orange citrus.
(D) California's proportion f non-orange citrus crops was higher than Florida's.
(E) California had more acreage that could be devoted to agriculture than did Florida.

31. Researchers studying sets of identical twins who were raised apart in dissimilar environments found that in each case the twins were similar in character, medical history, and life experiences. The researchers saw these results as confirmation of the hypothesis that heredity is more important than environment in determining human personalities and life histories.
 
The existence of which of the following would tend to weaken the support for the hypothesis above most seriously?

(A) A set of identical twins raised together who are shown by appropriate tests to have very similar value systems
(B) A pair of identical twins raised apart who differ markedly with respect to aggressiveness and other personality traits
(C) A younger brother and older sister raised together who have similar personalities and life experiences
(D) A mother and daughter who have the same profession even though they have very different temperaments
(E) A pair of twins raised together who have similar personality traits but different value systems

32. Because the process of freezing food consumes energy, many people keep their electric freezers half-empty, using them only to store commercially frozen foods. Yet freezers that are half-empty often consume more energy than they would if they were kept fully stocked.
 
Which of the following, if true, contributes most to an explanation of the apparent discrepancy described above?

(A) A given volume of air in a freezer requires much more energy to be maintained at a temperature below freezing than does an identical volume of frozen food.
(B) The more often a freezer's door is opened, the more energy is required to maintain that freezer's normal temperature.
(C) When unfrozen foods are placed in a freezer, the average temperature of a given volume of air inside that freezer rises temporarily.
(D) A person who normally maintains a half-empty freezer can cut energy costs considerably by using a freezer that is 50 percent smaller.
(E) An electric freezer can operate efficiently only if chilled air is free to circulate within the freezing compartment.

33. People often do not make decisions by using the basic economic principle of rationally weighing all possibilities and then making the choice that can be expected to maximize benefits and minimize harm. Routinely, people process information in ways that are irrational in this sense.
 
Any of the following, if true, would provide evidence in support of the assertions above EXCEPT:

(A) People tend to act on new information, independent of its perceived relative merit, rather than on information they already have.
(B) People prefer a major risk taken voluntarily to a minor one that has been forced on them, even if they know that the voluntarily taken risk is statistically more dangerous.
(C) People tend to take up potentially damaging habits even thought they have clear evidence that their own peers as well as experts disapprove of such behavior.
(D)  People avoid situations in which they would become involved in accidents involving large numbers of people more than they do situations where single- victim accidents are possible, even though they realize that an accident is more likely in the latter situations than in the former.
(E) People usually give more weight to a physician's opinion about the best treatment for a disease than they do to the opinion of a neighbor if they realize that the neighbor is not an expert in disease treatment.

34.Los Angeles has a higher number of family dwellings per capita than any large city.
(A) a higher number of family dwellings per capita than any large city
(B) higher numbers of family dwellings per capita than any other large city
(C) a higher number of family dwellings per capita than does any other large city
(D) higher numbers of family dwellings per capita than do other large cities
(E) a high per capita number of family dwellings, more than does any other large city

35.New techniques in thermal-scanning photography, a process that records radiation from surface areas, makes it possible to study the effects of calefaction, or warming, of a river in greater detail than ever before.
(A) makes it possible to study the effects of calefaction, or warming, of a river in greater detail than ever before
(B) make it possible to study, in greater detail, the effects of calefaction, or warming, of a river than ever before
(C) have made it possible to study in greater detail than ever before the effects of calefaction, or warming, of a river
(D) make possible the study of the effects of calefaction, or warming, of a river in greater detail than it ever was before
(E) has made it more possible than ever before to study in greater detail the effects of calefaction, or warming, of a river

36.Judge Forer recognizes that the American judicial system provides more safeguards for accused persons than does the legal system of any other country, but she believes there is a great disparity between the systems of justice accorded rich and poor.
(A) for accused persons than does the legal system of any other country
(B) to accused persons as the legal system of any country
(C) for accused persons as the legal system of any country
(D) to accused persons as the legal system of any other country
(E) for accused persons than the legal system of any country

37.Local residents claim that San Antonio, Texas, has more good Mexican American restaurants than any city does in the United States.
(A) any city does
(B) does any other city
(C) other cities do
(D) any city
(E) other cities

38.Inflation has made many Americans reevaluate their assumptions about the future; they still expect to live better than their parents have, but not so well as they once thought they could.
(A) they still expect to live better than their parents have
(B) they still expect to live better than their parents did
(C) they still expect to live better than their parents had
(D) still expecting to live better than their parents had
(E) still expecting to live better than did their parents

39.Inuits of the Bering Sea were in isolation from contact with Europeans longer than Aleuts or Inuits of the North Pacific and northern Alaska.
(A) in isolation from contact with Europeans longer than
(B) isolated from contact with Europeans longer than
(C) in isolation from contact with Europeans longer than were
(D) isolated from contact with Europeans longer than were
(E) in isolation and without contacts with Europeans longer than

40.In the United States, trade unions encountered far more intense opposition against their struggle for social legitimacy than the organized labor movements of most other democratic nations.
(A) against their struggle for social legitimacy than
(B) in their struggle for social legitimacy than did
(C) against their struggle for social legitimacy as
(D) in their struggle for social legitimacy as did
(E) when they struggled for social legitimacy than has

41.Increases in the cost of energy, turmoil in the international money markets, and the steady erosion of the dollar have altered the investment strategies of United States corporations more radically than those of foreign corporations.
(A) altered the investment strategies of United States corporations more radically than those of
(B) altered the investment strategies of United States corporations more radically than
(C) altered the investment strategies of United States corporations more radically than they have
(D) radically altered the investment strategies of United States corporations more than
(E) radically altered the investment strategies of United States and

Answers:

1.(D)

2.(B)

3.(A)

4.(E)

5.(D)

6.(C)

7. (D)

8. (D)

9. (A)

10. (C)

11.(B)

12.(D)

13.(A)

14.(A)

15.(B)

16.(C)

17.(D)

18. (C)

19. (E)

20.(D)

21.(D)

23.(D)

24.(B)

25.(E)

26.(A)

27.(B)

28.(A)

29.(C)

30.(D)

31. (B)

32.(A)

33.(E)

34. (C)

35. (C)

36. (A)

37. (B)

38. (B)

39. (D)

40. (B)

41. (A)



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